This is a Basel AML Index briefing following the decision of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) to delist Nicaragua from its list of jurisdictions under increased monitoring (“grey list”) in October 2022.

The briefing covers the main issues that led to Nicaragua being grey-listed in June 2021, the action plan developed to address them, and publicly available data on how it was implemented. 

This is a Basel AML Index briefing following the decision of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) to delist Pakistan from its list of jurisdictions under increased monitoring (“grey list”) in October 2022.

The briefing covers the main issues that led to Pakistan being grey-listed in June 2021, the action plan developed to address them, and publicly available data on how it was implemented. 

As the use of crypto assets expands into practically every country and sector, so does its abuse to commit new forms of crime and launder criminal proceeds. Yet with the right tools, capacity and cooperation, the unique characteristics of blockchain-based technologies offer an unprecedented opportunity to investigate organised crime and money laundering networks and to recover stolen funds.

These recommendations follow the 6th Global Conference on Criminal Finances and Cryptocurrencies on 1–2 September 2022. The conference was hosted by Europol at its headquarters in The Hague, the Netherlands, together with the Basel Institute on Governance through the Joint Working Group on Criminal Finances and Cryptocurrencies.

This is a Basel AML Index briefing on countries in Sub-Saharan Africa subject to grey-listing by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) .

The briefing covers the impacts on their economic development, the process of grey-listing and what governments need to do to be removed from the list. It also touches on specific areas of concern for anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing (AML/CFT) in Sub-Saharan Africa. 

A joint blog by Kateryna Boguslavska, Basel Institute on Governance and Maria Nizzero, Royal United Services Institute (RUSI).

Effectively tackling illicit finance and money laundering is crucial to the integrity not only of financial systems, but of democratic societies. And alongside fresh ideas and commitments on fighting financial crimes, we need faster progress on existing ones.

This is the 11th Public Edition of the Basel AML Index.

The Basel AML Index is an independent annual ranking that assesses the risk of money laundering and terrorist financing (ML/TF) around the world.

Published by the Basel Institute on Governance since 2012, it provides risk scores based on data from 18 publicly available sources such as the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), Transparency International, the World Bank and the World Economic Forum. The risk scores cover five domains:

The final recommendation of the Commission of Inquiry into Money Laundering in British Columbia (‘the Commission’) urged the government to legislate an unexplained wealth order (‘UWO’) as part of a wider approach to counter the prevalence of money laundering and proceeds of crime in the province.

This document analyses the feasibility of this recommendation. It: