This is the 12th Public Edition of the Basel AML Index.

The Basel AML Index is an independent annual ranking that assesses the risk of money laundering and terrorist financing (ML/TF) around the world.

Published by the Basel Institute on Governance since 2012, it provides risk scores based on data from 18 publicly available sources such as the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), Transparency International, the World Bank and the World Economic Forum. The risk scores cover five domains:

The Basel AML Index Expert Edition Plus subscription (free for practically all users outside the private sector) has introduced a new feature: an approach for predicting which jurisdictions are at risk of being placed on the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) “grey list” of "jurisdictions under increased monitoring".

A hybrid international conference attended by 1,300 participants has concluded that tackling the criminal use of cryptocurrencies is a race against time. Law enforcement agencies that collaborate in joint task teams and proactively collaborate with the private sector are getting ahead of the criminals. In contrast, countries that do not take the risks seriously are in danger of becoming a haven for crypto-enabled scams, money laundering and terrorist financing.

The Basel AML Index – the Basel Institute’s global money laundering index and risk assessment tool – will see a small but important methodology update this year. The aim is to better reflect the progress of jurisdictions that have graduated from the so-called grey list of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), the global standard setter for anti-money laundering and counter financing of terrorism (AML/CFT).

A blog by Zisheng Xing, a law student at the Arizona State University who is undertaking a legal research internship at the Basel Institute on Governance.

A monumental anti-money laundering fine recently dropped in Australia, sending shockwaves throughout the gambling industry – a sector well-known for flying under the radar of anti-money laundering and counter financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) regulations.

After the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the wide-reaching sanctions which ensued, many Western financial institutions began to de-risk Russian clients. Dealing with Russian clients, in many cases, has become expensive from a compliance point of view and toxic from the reputational side.

However, the de-risking of unsanctioned Russian individuals may have a significant impact on the fight against financial crime by potentially causing:

A four-day training course on the fundamentals of cryptocurrencies, financial crime and anti-money laundering (AML) compliance.

Delivered virtually over four 3-hour sessions, the course aims to help practitioners from a wide range of law enforcement, financial and business sectors prevent, detect and investigate the use of cryptocurrencies for illicit activities. 

A four-day training course on the fundamentals of cryptocurrencies, financial crime and anti-money laundering (AML) compliance.

Delivered virtually over four 3-hour sessions, the course aims to help practitioners from a wide range of law enforcement, financial and business sectors prevent, detect and investigate the use of cryptocurrencies for illicit activities.