B20 Australia (2014)

The B20 Australia Presidency in 2014 established an Anti-Corruption Working Group.

Anti-corruption was also a cross-cutting theme across the other taskforces or working groups: Trade; Infrastructure & Investment; Financing Growth; Human Capital.

The G20 Anti-Corruption Working Group also published a new Action Plan for 2015–2016.

Policy document: B20 Anti-Corruption Working Group Report to the B20 Office and Taskforce Chairs

Excerpts:

Overall recommendations

1. G20 Governments agree to harmonise laws related to anti-corruption that incentivise companies to build best practice compliance programs and self-report compliance breaches; and: 

  • form a working group consisting of business and enforcement agencies to map jurisdictional differences, propose regulatory change that recognises anti-corruption programs and self-reporting, and monitor progress. 

2. G20 Governments endorse the G8 core principles around transparency of ownership and control of companies and legal arrangements. 

3. G20 governments to commit to enforcing the existing OECD Anti-Bribery Convention and the UN Convention against Corruption, and: 

  1. take steps to install and/or build capacity for high level reporting mechanisms in at-risk public offices where any party can report violations of anti-bribery and anti-corruption laws; 
  2. strengthen cooperation between law enforcement agencies and national HLRMs and appoint a lead agency where multiple jurisdictions are involved; and 
  3. make information on enforcement procedures and actions publicly available. 
Trade taskforce recommendations

4. G20 governments to commit to begin immediate implementation the trade facilitation agreement, with priority given to: 

  • a. transparency of fees, charges, procedures, timeframes and regulations; and
  • b. implementation of one-stop and automated customs procedures. 

5. G20 governments ensure that all new trade agreements include specific anti- corruption clauses, requiring signatories to uphold the UN Convention against Corruption and OECD Anti-Bribery Convention, and install High Level Reporting Mechanisms (3.a). 

Human Capital taskforce recommendations

1. G20 Governments agree to harmonise laws related to anti-corruption that incentivise companies to build best practice compliance programs and self-report compliance breaches; and 

  • a. form a working group consisting of business and enforcement agencies to map jurisdictional differences, propose regulatory change that recognises anti-corruption programs and self reporting, and monitor progress. 
Infrastructure & Investment taskforce recommendations

6. G20 governments apply best practice procurement processes in all large and/or publicly significant infrastructure projects: 

  1. Projects must comply with recognised best practice, either those developed through the G20 ACWG, or one of the World Bank, UNODC or OECD guidelines; and 
  2. High Level Reporting Mechanisms should be installed or developed in relation to procurement and execution of public infrastructure projects (3.a). 

7. G20 governments incentivise companies bidding for large and/or publicly significant infrastructure projects that have in place best practice anti-corruption compliance programs. Companies that can demonstrate this capacity should receive awarded bonus points and positive recognition in the bidding process. Governments should also: 

  1. support verification of the quality of these compliance programs by recognised professional bodies or accredited experts; 
  2. consider entering into integrity pacts and/or independent monitoring over the life of the project; and 
  3. encourage knowledge sharing and capacity building initiatives amongst businesses to develop compliance programs throughout their supply chain. 

8. IMITs should require signatories to enforce their anti-corruption and transparency obligations, undertake capacity building for public officials, and install high level reporting mechanisms to govern the treaty. 

Financing Growth taskforce recommendations

2. G20 governments endorse the G8 core principles around transparency of ownership and control of companies and legal arrangements.